May 2010
Bloody oil - Shut down the tar sands!

 

As conventional sources of oil are running dry, or are too hazardous to extract, oil companies are turning to 'unconventional' deposits of the black stuff. By far the largest is Canada's tar sands, the second biggest oil reserve in the world. The past decade has seen a black gold rush of unprecedented proportions, and the tar sands development in Alberta is now the largest industrial development on earth. But it is also, perhaps, the most destructive. This month's New Internationalist exposes the severe human and environmental costs of Canada's dramatic transformation from global good guy to corrupt petro-state, and profiles some of the key figures in what is shaping up to be an iconic struggle in the effort to drag the world back from the brink of a fossil fuel-dependent future.

 



NI

No.431

Contents

 

 

 

2 Letters

3 Letter from Cairo
Maria Golia feels she's getting old, while the city around her is 'getting new'.

4 Taking on Tarmageddon
The international campaign to shut down the tar sands is shaping up to be an iconic battle, reports Jess Worth.

8 Canada's curse
Vast reserves of the black stuff are bringing the country nothing but trouble, argues Andrew Nikiforuk.

11 Escape from Mordor
Leading Canadian activist Maude Barlow explains how trade agreements are driving the death of nature.

12 'I'll die doing this'
Zoe Cormier meets two indigenous people for whom this fight couldn't be more personal.

16 Rock that burns
There are tar sands deposits all over the world. Mika Minio-Paluello visits two of them.

18 Everyone's downstream
From banks to pipeline routes, refineries to courthouses, meet the activists and communities at the frontline of resistance.

20 Take action
Simple things you can do NOW, and a directory of films, books and organizations.

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SPECIAL FEATURES

21 Ethiopia's endangered democracy
With elections fast approaching, Nick Hunt exposes how Meles Zenawi's Government has turned its back on its people.

24 The fall of King Tuna
The fate of our favourite fish hangs in the balance. Sara Holden and Greg McNevin explain what needs to be done to give it, and countless other ocean dwellers, a fighting chance.

28 A soldier's story
Gopal Mitra experienced the violence and tragedy of Kashmir firsthand, but is hopeful of a peaceful future, as Jeremy Seabrook discovers.
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30 Currents
Difficult times in post-coup Honduras; India says no to GM aubergines; and fighting for gay rights in homophobic Uganda.

31 Only Planet
Gort and Klaatu are unimpressed with their human fix in Marc Roberts' cartoon.

33 Big Bad World
Conspiracy theories in Polyp's cartoon.
PLUS: NI Prize Crossword.

34 Mixed Media
A surprisingly uplifting Argentinean prison drama; getting jiggy with Carolina Chocolate Drops; and Wade Davis tells us why ancient wisdom still matters.

36 Country profile: Tunisia


 

 

 

 

NI Japan

No.119

Contents

 

From this month's theme

<translation>
- Taking on Tarmageddon (NI p4-7)


<summary>
- Canada's curse (NI p8-10)
- 'I'll die doing this' (NI p12-15)

From Special Features and other articles
<summary>
- The fall of King Tuna (NI p24-27)
- Normalizing a coup (NI p30)
- A fishy business (NI p32)



 

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